Michael J. Swart

January 30, 2014

Building Concurrency Tests

Testing Concurrency

So last week, I explained different ways to generate concurrent activity. I have my own favorites, but you may have your own. So pick your favorite method; whichever method you picked, it will help you call the procedure s_DoSomething super-often.

Now comes the task of defining the procedure s_DoSomething. It can be whatever you like depending on what functionality you want to test or exercise. I want to demonstrate some patterns that I follow when I define that procedure. Those patterns all start with …

the Basic Definition

To test the concurrency of a single procedure just call it:

use tempdb
GO
 
CREATE PROCEDURE dbo.s_DoSomething AS
 
EXEC Adventureworks2012.dbo.uspGetManagerEmployees 14;

Of course, I could have changed the framework to call my procedure directly but I don’t out of habit. I always leave s_DoSomething in tempdb hard-coded in the framework.

With Arbitrary Parameter Values

Often the procedures I want to test are defined with parameters. If variety is important, but the parameter values are not, then that’s when the random tricks come in:

ALTER PROCEDURE dbo.s_DoSomething AS
 
DECLARE @someString nvarchar(100) = cast(newid() as nvarchar(100));
DECLARE @someInt int = RAND() * 100;
DECLARE @someDate datetime = dateadd(MINUTE, RAND() * 10000, getdate());
DECLARE @someLongerString nvarchar(1000) = REPLICATE(@someString,20);
 
EXEC Adventureworks2012.dbo.usp_ProcWithParameters
	@someString, @someInt, @someDate, @someLongerString;

With Less Arbitrary Parameter Values

Check out this next example. Pulling a value from the target database is often preferable to calling the procedure with a random integer value.

ALTER PROCEDURE dbo.s_DoSomething AS
 
DECLARE @BusinessEntityId int;
 
SELECT TOP 1 @BusinessEntityId = BusinessEntityID 
FROM AdventureWorks2012.HumanResources.Employee
ORDER BY newid();
 
EXEC AdventureWorks2012.dbo.uspGetEmployeeManagers @BusinessEntityId;

Calling More Than One Procedure

It’s as simple as calling one after the other. But sometimes I want the frequency of the calls “weighted”.

For example, I want to have a DELETE, INSERT and UPDATE statements called 10% of the time each. The remaining 70% of the time I want to call a SELECT statement. Then I have something like:

ALTER PROCEDURE dbo.s_DoSomething AS
 
declare @r int = RAND() * 10;
 
IF (@r = 0)
  -- delete 10% of the time
  DELETE AdventureWorks2012.Person.BusinessEntity
  WHERE BusinessEntityID = CAST(RAND()*1000 as INT);
 
IF (@r = 1)
  -- insert 10% of the time
  INSERT AdventureWorks2012.Person.BusinessEntity (rowguid)
  VALUES (newid());
 
IF (@r = 2)
  -- update 10% of the time
  UPDATE AdventureWorks2012.Person.BusinessEntity
  SET rowguid = newid()
  WHERE BusinessEntityID = CAST(RAND()*1000 as INT);
 
IF (@r > 2)
  -- select the rest of the time
  SELECT BusinessEntityId, rowguid, ModifiedDate
  FROM AdventureWorks2012.Person.BusinessEntity
  WHERE BusinessEntityID = CAST(RAND()*1000 as INT);

Counting Errors Concurrently

I want to track (server side) how often s_DoSomething fails. But I don’t want tracking to be a concurrency bottleneck itself. Here’s a cool trick for that:
First define these procedures:

create procedure dbo.s_IFailed as
go
 
create procedure dbo.s_IPassed as
go
 
alter procedure dbo.s_DoSomething as
 
begin try
    declare @i int = rand() * 10;
    select @i = 1 / @i -- might divide by 0!
    exec dbo.s_IPassed;
end try
begin catch
    exec dbo.s_IFailed;
end catch

This lets me use DMVs to monitor the success rate because I can check the execution count of my dummy procedures. For example,

exec sp_recompile 'dbo.s_IFailed'; -- reset counts from other tests.
exec sp_recompile 'dbo.s_IPassed';
go
 
/* run concurrent test here, or...*/
set nocount on; 
exec dbo.s_DoSomething;
go 10000
 
select object_name(object_id), execution_count 
from sys.dm_exec_procedure_stats
where object_name(object_id) in ('s_IFailed','s_IPassed')
/*
--         count
s_IPassed   9031
s_IFailed    969
*/

This relies on the DMV sys.dm_exec_procedure_stats which was introduced in 2008. It’s like a cheap do-it-yourself, performance counter.

Next

Next week I want to show a demo. I want to show this technique in action. I’ll be troubleshooting a common concurrency problem, the deadlock.

1 Comment »

  1. […] Building Concurrency Tests - Michael J. Swart (Blog|Twitter) continues his excellent series on building a framework for testing concurrent activity in SQL Server. I think I’ll be borrowing this. […]

    Pingback by (SFTW) SQL Server Links 31/01/14 • John Sansom — January 31, 2014 @ 4:17 am

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