Michael J. Swart

January 12, 2018

100 Percent Online Deployments: Keep Changes OLTP-Friendly

Filed under: Miscelleaneous SQL,SQLServerPedia Syndication,Technical Articles — Michael J. Swart @ 9:00 am
100 Percent Online Deployments
How to deploy schema changes without scheduled downtime

Using the Blue-Green deployment method, database changes are decoupled from applications changes. That leaves us with one last challenge to tackle. The schema changes have to be performed while the application is online. It’s true that you can’t always write an online script for every kind of schema change you want.

I got the moves like Jagger

The challenge of writing online schema changes is essentially a concurrency problem and the guiding principle I follow is: Do whatever you need to do, but avoid excessive blocking.

Locks Are Hot Potatoes

You can’t hold them for long. This applies to schema changes too. Logically if you don’t hold a lock long, you can’t block activity. One exception might be the SCH-M lock which can participate in blocking chains:

SCH-M locks

There are two main kinds of SQL queries. SELECT/INSERT/UPDATE/DELETE statements are examples of Data Manipulation Language (DML). CREATE/ALTER/DROP statements are examples of Data Definition Language (DDL).

With schema changes – DDL – we have the added complexity of the SCH-M lock. It’s a kind of lock you don’t see with DML statements. DML statements take and hold schema stability locks (SCH-S) on the tables they need. This can cause interesting blocking chains between the two types where new queries can’t start until the schema change succeeds:

Some suggestions:

  • Don’t rebuild indexes while changing schema
  • Rely on the OLTP workload which has many short queries. In an OLTP workload, the lead blocker shouldn’t be a lead blocker for long. Contrast that with an OLAP workload with long-running and overlapping queries. OLAP workloads can’t tolerate changing tables without delays or interruptions.
  • When using Enterprise Edition, use ONLINE=ON for indexes. It takes and holds a SCH-M lock only briefly.

Changes to Big Tables

Scripts that change schema are one-time scripts. If the size of the table is less than 50,000 rows, I write a simple script and then move on.

If the table is larger, look for metadata-only changes. For example, these changes are metadata-only changes:

If a table change is not a meta-data change, then it’s a size-of-data change. Then it’s time to get creative. Look for my other post in this series for an example of batching and an example of a column switcheroo.

Pragmatism Example

If you think “good enough” is neither, you may want to skip this section. There are some schema changes that are still very difficult or impossible to write online. With some creativity, we’ve always been able to mitigate these issues with shortcuts and I want to give an example which I think is pretty illustrative.

When a colleague asked for a rowversion column on a humongous table. We avoided that requirement by instead creating a datetime column called LastModifiedDate. Since 2012, new columns with constant default values are online. So we added the column with a constant default, and then changed the default value to something more dynamic:

alter table dbo.MYTABLE
add LastModifiedDate DATETIME NOT NULL 
    CONSTRAINT DF_TABLE_LastModifiedDate DEFAULT '20000101'
alter table dbo.MYTABLE
drop CONSTRAINT DF_TABLE_LastModifiedDate;
alter table dbo.MYTABLE
add CONSTRAINT DF_TABLE_LastModifiedDate 
      DEFAULT GETUTCDATE() for LastModifiedDate;

It’s a cool situation because it seems like the column has two defaults, one constant default for rows with missing values. And another definition to be used for new rows:

select pc.default_value, d.definition as [default definition]
from sys.system_internals_partitions p
join sys.system_internals_partition_columns pc 
	on p.partition_id = pc.partition_id
join sys.default_constraints d
	on d.parent_object_id = p.object_id
	and d.parent_column_id = pc.partition_column_id
where p.object_id = object_id('MYTABLE')
and pc.partition_column_id = 2
/* Gives 
default_value  default definition
-------------  ------------------
2000-01-01     (getutcdate())

So be creative and pragmatic. Successful 100% online schema changes involve creativity and close collaboration between everyone involved.

1 Comment »

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